61 Hours

Tuesday morning I woke up a dog-owner, knowing by lunch I wouldn’t be anymore. Which made it hard to look in the mirror as I brushed a cloud of toothpaste around my mouth. Muni - short for Muneco - was described as a 6-pound, 8-year-old, brindle, one-eyed, blind chihuahua. When I told people I was adopting a dog who could use his own seeing eye dog, people had one of two reactions...

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Untitled :: An Essay Written for YG2D February

I left, my hands clean, but I couldn’t stop thinking about that motherly lie rolling off her tongue, teaching her child something much bigger than cleanliness is next to godliness. Like so many parents before her, mine included, Mom taught Daughter there’s no choice. A person has obligations. You have to do things. To fit in. To get through this world. To live.

When really, the only thing we have to do in this lifetime is die.

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When Did Email Get So Serious?

But worse still, not only has the quantity of words gone down though, something far worse is at stake: the quality of my emails have plummeted, too. The sentences are shorter. The details vaguer. The typos aplenty. The introspectiveness dropping like a hot sweet potato accidentally inserted into a hungry mouth far too soon, and the whimsically cavalier nature of it all burned down like an unplanned forest fire till only the indifference remains. 

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Magic Words Every Potential Client Wants to Hear (& Other Tips for Landing the Job)

Exploratory conversations — aka interviews — are your time to give a potential client a little insight into who you are, how you work, and what you can bring to the table. Unless you're the perfect blend of chimera (metaphorically), charisma (personally), and chocolate (literally), you’ll need to do more than show up on time for a getting-to-know-all-about-you-conversation to guarantee the team on the other side of the line says, “We choose you!”

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PUT AN ADVERB ON IT: THE TALE OF THE SUDDENLY NOT-SCARCE ADVERB

It’s hard not to think about how our culture has grown to overuse or misuse an abundance of vocabulary, like awesome, epic, mind-blowing, and literally. Yet it’s no wonder we do. We want to somehow be more than our parents. We want to denote that things have changed, are changing, and will continue to change. Modifying the words we use is one way keep overuse or misuse at bay - or expand upon them. 

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Two Pieces

“I hate my birthday,” I replied carelessly. My parents’ heads snapped up from the task of getting in their car. My brother smoothed everything over with a quip and the stems of wine we all had over dinner make us laugh rather than focus on the gravity of what I just admitted for the first time to the people who made my birthday possible.

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Why Jordana Narin’s “No Labels, No Drama, Right?” is So Damn Spot On

As someone who has spent the last year and a half without definition in my intimate connections (though certainly with plenty of defining moments, and yes mom, that’s all I’ll say about that), I placed my chin in the palm of my hand like a teacup rests in a saucer as I read Jordana Narin’s New York Times article, No Labels, No Drama, Right? as if such intensity could give her answers I’m still trying to find.

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